Susan Boulton: author
Susan Boulton: author

More reviews for Hand of Glory.

 

Review on Barnes on Noble.

Review

"It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time."

 It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.

It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.=====vIt's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your time.It's a ghost story... but not quite, for the ghosts flow from the horrors the characters have faced, both in childhood and in the trenches of Flanders. It's a murder mystery... but not quite, for from the outset we know "Who done it." It's a police procedural... but not quite, for the procedures come from a time long passed. It's a love story... but not quite, for the two lovers are war-damaged goods, and only rarely do they take center stage together. Whatever the book may be, it's unique and well worth your timeGeek Pride Review

Review

"It was refreshing to find that the soldiers in Boulton’s novel are neither heroes or villains, but utterly human.  Boulton uses her portrayal of their shattered humanity to capture the grim despair that saturated World War One and the subsequent peace.  Ultimately, for all the supernatural elements, Hand of Glory is a tale about the true cost of our humanity and how we should remember those who have died."

 

 Review by Retired Royal Naval Commander and author, Roger Paine

Review

"Her use of dialogue, whether it is the crude obscenities of the soldiers, or the nuances of conversation at home in the 1920’s, is masterful and her characters, despite Gothic overtones, are real people.

The author’s imagination is channelled to ensure a fast paced story which keeps the reader wanting to reach the final page.  But it is a book recommended for reading in broad daylight rather than by firelight on a dark winter’s evening."

 

Two new reviews of Hand of Glory are in.

 

One in Starburst Magazine, one of the oldest Genre magazines around.

 

Starburst Review.

 

“This isn’t really a tale of the supernatural, although the sequences describing the hand of glory are very well put together. This is a novel about war and its after-effects, as seen through the eyes of several very different characters. It’s also a novel about the nature of grief, and of the way soldiers were treated when they returned home from the front line. These were men who would never completely be able to return to ‘normal’ society, whose physical and mental scars would pursue them forever. Susan Boulton tells their stories very well – the scenes on the battlefield are especially convincing – and her characters, despite being the familiar stereotypes, are nicely colourful creations.”

 

 

And one in Sffworld by N.E. White.

 

Sffworld review.

 

“Regardless, if you’re a World War One aficionado, this is a book you don’t want to miss. It mixes war and post-war trauma with a mythological tale that is both imaginative, and disturbingly real. There’s always going to be thieves among us. Let’s just hope none of ‘em get any ideas from Susan!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviews 2015-2016

Super review from Stephen Palmer.

 

 

Review of Oracle by Stephen Palmer

 

 

 

 

 

Review from artist and author Cynthia Radthorne

 

There is a compelling allure to Susan Boulton’s steampunk-oriented novel Oracle. It stems from any of a number of sound reasons: the intricate political intrigue; the nuanced characters who say, but don’t always say, what they really mean; and throughout the course of the novel, the compelling story of Oracle and who she was, who she is, and what she means to different people and factions. Overlaying all of this is one of those oft-neglected parts of the novel craft: texture. You feel yourself in Boulton’s world: you touch the wood and iron, you sense the steam wafting around, you smell the varnish and the crystal decanter and even the suppleness of a chair’s fabric. Such attention to detail brings Boulton’s world to life such that the story feels rich, the world fully realized, and the characters an integral part of a whole. This is very solid, very entertaining read and brings a talented voice into the genre.

 

 

 

 

Review from author, Jo Zebedee

 

I really enjoyed Oracle. Hand on heart, I wasn't sure if I would - I'm not hugely into political stories, more character focused and wasn't sure if I'd keep up with the story.

Actually, I had no problem. There is a large cast of characters but they are distinct from each other, and nicely drawn. Claire/Oracle draws us in from the beginning, even in the desperate straits she is in. Pugh grew as the book went on from someone who seemed a little lost to a fully rounded character. However, for me, the characterisation of ambitious politician Calvinward was beautifully done and presented a well-rounded character who I grew to like.

 

The pace is good, rarely letting up. The depiction of the world and the descriptions are also good, with some nice 'showing' scenes of the mill working. The storyline is complex, with nice twists and turns, and delivers an ending I found satisfying, with enough left open for me to wonder if we might see more in this world.

 

For me, the characterisation of Mathew let it down a little - I found it hard to reconcile the later Mathew with the young idealist from the early chapters. I also felt that Emily faded from the story and became rather sidelined just as she was growing as a character and would have liked to have seen her more active.

For anyone who likes their fantasy a little different, with a grittier setting than some, and well drawn characters, this one is a treat.

 

 

 

Reviews on Goodreads doing well!

 

 Goodreads

 

 

Review on Amazon!  Very pleased. Things have begun to move.

 

Review on Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviews from Ian Whates and

Kim Larkin-Smith

 

 

“Steam power is king in Susan Boulton’s compelling novel, a helter-skelter ride of intrigue and wonder set against a vividly imagined world in the throes of great social and industrial upheaval. Fully realised characters, twists, thrilling narrative, and a touch of the divine: I challenge anyone who picks up Oracle to put it down again without having read all the way through to the end.” – Ian Whates

 

“Susan Boulton is an empress of Gaslight Fantasy. Her debut novel, Oracle, weaves a rich damask of political intrigue and power wrangling, seers and science, industrial revolutions and grand engines, elegant design and a whole head of steam.” – Kim Lakin-Smith.

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